Foibles: A Mother-Daughter Podcast
Foibles Episode 12: Part 3- Cirrhosis by the Sea

Foibles Episode 12: Part 3- Cirrhosis by the Sea

May 11, 2019

Bibliography:

My Days with Errol Flynn by Buster Wiles, 1988. (Mostly about Wiles and a few anecdotes about Flynn. Not very well written.)
Errol Flynn: A Memoir by Earl Conrad, 1978. (Written by the ghost writer of Flynn's autobiography, My Wicked Wicked Ways. Mostly covers the sad, decadent last year of Flynn's life.)
The Two Lives of Errol Flynn by Michael Freedland, 1978. (Contains a few unique anedotes from co-stars such as Ida Lupino.)
The Life and Work of Errol Flynn: A Psycholanalytical Biography by B. Dramov, 2005. (Very sympathetic to Flynn and finger-pointing at his mother and other women - it's true they were pretty rough. But let's him off the hook for his behavior.)
My Wicked, Wicked Ways by Errol Flynn, 1959. (This came out just after Flynn's death. It's sad that he had to rely on a ghost writer because Flynn had been a writer in his younger, healthier days.)
The Films of Errol Flynn by Tony Thomas, et. al., 1969.

Documentaries:

Errol Flynn: Portait of a Swashbuckler, Kultur, 1993.
The Adventures of Errol Flynn, Turner Entertainment Co, 2005.

Best Errol Flynn Movies:

Flynn had a lot of box office success in dozens of mediocre or worst quality films. But, particularly, early in his career he starred in a come gems. Xoe and I agree that the two best by far are
1) Captain Blood (1935) Here's my 5-star review from Letterboxd - My user name is Rema if you want to read more.
Blood! Blood!! Blood!!!
When I first saw this in my 20's, I could not believe that such a wonderful thing existed. Absolutely witty, action -packed and joyous.
I immediately fell in love with Basil Rathbone, the greatest fencer in Hollywood. My friend was the Errol Flynn fan. Though he was one of the prettiest humans to ever live, he was too good-looking for me. Luckily, his success in this role emanates from an earnest insouciance and obvious intelligence, as well as, a bouncy charm - not just good looks.
As I watch this again for the 20th time, it is easy to see that Flynn is, by far, a better actor than Rathbone. And Flynn's immediate star status is understandable. Honestly, I don't think anyone else in the history of cinema could actually carry off the line, "Bedad, that's queer!"
But the script and direction would made this film a hit anyway. Based on Rafael Sabatini's novel Captain Blood, there is ready-made witty dialogue that the screenwriters had the good sense to retain. Director Michael Curtiz is a powerful action stylist, who proves verisimilitude tempered with human pathos or humor, as needed.
This is the first pairing of Flynn with 17-year-old Olivia de Haviland. Her character Arabella Bishop is a good match for Peter Blood because she has agency, which she exercises to the frustration and ultimate delight of Captain Blood.
There are so many wonderful studio character actors here that I can't start or I would never stop. Peruse the IMDB page to see all great actors in this (Guy Kibbee, Henry Stephenson...)
One tidbit I read in Basil Rathbone's biography: He thought it would a cool idea if he kept his eyes open after he died during a duel, like a real corpse. Unfortunately for him, the duel took place on a beach and he fell into the ocean. The saltwater stung his eyes like the bejesus. Watch the scene as see how hard it is for him to keep his eyes open.
The best double feature for this is The Adventures of Robin Hood, with essentially the same cast.
2) The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) Here's my 5-star review from Letterboxd - My user name is Rema if you want to read more.
In 80 years, no one has done the story of Robin Hood better or even as well. And in 80 years, there has been no one who is a better Robin Hood than Errol Flynn.
Flynn and the rest of the cast attack the centuries old myth of Robin Hood with a joie de vivre that is impossible to resist. Critical judgment is put on hold until the last hearty laugh echoes away. And there are as many laughs, chortles, chuckles and guffaws as there are stars in the sky.
Yes, everything is Hollywood -ized and glamorized but what a tale, what fun!
This is a film that is so chock-full of studio contract players that if I started I would go on and on. So I will pick a very few, warning you that I am leaving large painful holes in this review:
Olivia de Havilland (Maid Marian) (FYI- She still alive and 101 in 2018!!) - I must speak about her performance because I have overlooked her intelligent approach to a fairly thin role. You can see behind her eyes that Marian is no dope, though she has been duped by her class and privilege about the plight of the English. It is easy to believe that once she sees the truth that her intelligence and compassion will force her to act against her class (sort of).
Basil Rathbone - who I love so much I once names my cat Rasil Bathbone. One of the greatest fencer in Hollywood. He is magnificent in his role as the evil Guy of Gisbourne. He is as dashing as Robin Hood, though less merry.
I'll stay my hand here and suggest a couple of good double features:
Captain Blood with almost the same cast filmed 3 years earlier; or,
The silent Robin Hood (1922) with Douglas Fairbanks Sr.
Fact: Alan Hale Sr play LIttle John in both the 1922 and 1938 versions! He's the father of Alan Hale Jr who was the Skipper on Gilligan's Island.
3) Rita's number 3 is Dawn Patrol (1938). Here's my 4-star review from Letterboxd - My user name is Rema if you want to read more.
There were two The Dawn Patrols made in the 1930’s: the original in 1930 and a remake in 1938. This is study in how different equally good talents synergize in different ways. The same script is used in both (judiciously tweaked for the remake),a very similar set and a lot of the same aerial and bombing footage. But a different director and cast. What a difference! The remake wins – hands down.
The 1930 Howard Hawks version stars Richard Barthelmess, Douglas Fairbanks Jr (both of whom had affairs with Marlene Dietrich) and Neil Hamilton (whose enduring fame will be as Commissioner Gordon in the original Batman TV show). Despite their similar romantic background, Barthelmess and Fairbanks don't exhibit the easy, uninhibited camaraderie of the later cast.
They can't stand up in comparison to the 1938 mega-watt stars Errol Flynn, David Niven and Basil Rathbone. Flynn, Niven and Rathbone fairly pop their buttons with energy and charisma. Flynn and Niven were also good friends, which cemented their chemistry on film.
In addition, Flynn, et. al. are aided by better lighting, better sound and a more fluid directorial style. Talkies had only been around for about a year when the first version was filmed, so the eight years of technical advancement between the 2 versions accounts for some the 1938’s enhanced vivacity and glamour.
Rathbone, who was a decorated WWI veteran, is a more commanding actor that Neil Hamilton. Rathbone dominates the screen as the twitchy, cold-eyed officer who is forced to send untested pilots to their certain deaths. His style is more theatrically grand in comparison to Flynn and Niven’s naturalistic, casual acting but it works to convey the intensity of his pain at being stuck in the rotten job he was given.
Both films have an exciting battle sequence at the end, using much of the same footage shot by Hawkes. I think the 1938 version squeaks ahead on this final battle just a little because Flynn is so doggone handsome.
Double feature with Porco Rosso (1992).

Theme: "Future Mind" by Powerbeeder <3

Foibles Episode 12: Errol Flynn Part 2 - In Like Flynn

Foibles Episode 12: Errol Flynn Part 2 - In Like Flynn

April 13, 2019

Errol Flynn Podcast Notes

Bibliography:
My Days with Errol Flynn by Buster Wiles, 1988. (Mostly about Wiles and a few anecdotes about Flynn. Not very well written.)
Errol Flynn: A Memoir by Earl Conrad, 1978. (Written by the ghost writer of Flynn's autobiography, My Wicked Wicked Ways. Mostly covers the sad, decadent last year of Flynn's life.)
The Two Lives of Errol Flynn by Michael Freedland, 1978. (Contains a few unique anedotes from co-stars such as Ida Lupino.)
The Life and Work of Errol Flynn: A Psycholanalytical Biography by B. Dramov, 2005. (Very sympathetic to Flynn and finger-pointing at his mother and other women - it's true they were pretty rough. But let's him off the hook for his behavior.)
My Wicked, Wicked Ways by Errol Flynn, 1959. (This came out just after Flynn's death. It's sad that he had to rely on a ghost writer because Flynn had been a writer in his younger, healthier days.)
The Films of Errol Flynn by Tony Thomas, et. al., 1969.

Documentaries:
Errol Flynn: Portait of a Swashbuckler, Kultur, 1993.
The Adventures of Errol Flynn, Turner Entertainment Co, 2005.

Best Errol Flynn Movies:
Flynn had a lot of box office success in dozens of mediocre or worst quality films. But, particularly, early in his career he starred in a come gems. Xoe and I agree that the two best by far are

1) Captain Blood (1935) Here's my 5-star review from Letterboxd - My user name is Rema if you want to read more.

Blood! Blood!! Blood!!!

When I first saw this in my 20's, I could not believe that such a wonderful thing existed. Absolutely witty, action -packed and joyous.

I immediately fell in love with Basil Rathbone, the greatest fencer in Hollywood. My friend was the Errol Flynn fan. Though he was one of the prettiest humans to ever live, he was too good-looking for me. Luckily, his success in this role emanates from an earnest insouciance and obvious intelligence, as well as, a bouncy charm - not just good looks.

As I watch this again for the 20th time, it is easy to see that Flynn is, by far, a better actor than Rathbone. And Flynn's immediate star status is understandable. Honestly, I don't think anyone else in the history of cinema could actually carry off the line, "Bedad, that's queer!"

But the script and direction would made this film a hit anyway. Based on Rafael Sabatini's novel Captain Blood, there is ready-made witty dialogue that the screenwriters had the good sense to retain. Director Michael Curtiz is a powerful action stylist, who proves verisimilitude tempered

This is the first pairing of Flynn with 17-year-old Olivia de Haviland. Her character Arabella Bishop is a good match for Peter Blood because she has agency, which she exercises to the frustration and ultimate delight of Captain Blood.

There are so many wonderful studio character actors here that I can't start or I would never stop. Peruse the IMDB page to see all great actors in this (Guy Kibbee, Henry Stephenson...)
One tidbit I read in Basil Rathbone's biography: He thought it would a cool idea if he kept his eyes open after he died during a duel, like a real corpse. Unfortunately for him, the duel took place on a beach and he fell into the ocean. The saltwater stung his eyes like the bejesus. Watch the scene as see how hard it is for him to keep his eyes open.

The best double feature for this is The Adventures of Robin Hood, with essentially the same cast.

2) The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) Here's my 5-star review from Letterboxd - My user name is Rema if you want to read more.

In 80 years, no one has done the story of Robin Hood better or even as well. And in 80 years, there has been no one who is a better Robin Hood than Errol Flynn.

Flynn and the rest of the cast attack the centuries old myth of Robin Hood with a joie de vivre that is impossible to resist. Critical judgment is put on hold until the last hearty laugh echoes away. And there are as many laughs, chortles, chuckles and guffaws as there are stars in the sky.

Yes, everything is Hollywood -ized and glamorized but what a tale, what fun!
This is a film that is so chock-full of studio contract players that if I started I would go on and on. So I will pick a very few, warning you that I am leaving large painful holes in this review:
Olivia de Havilland (Maid Marian) (FYI- She still alive and 101 in 2018!!) - I must speak about her performance because I have overlooked her intelligent approach to a fairly thin role. You can see behind her eyes that Marian is no dope, though she has been duped by her class and privilege about the plight of the English. It is easy to believe that once she sees the truth that her intelligence and compassion will force her to act against her class (sort of).

Basil Rathbone - who I love so much I once names my cat Rasil Bathbone. One of the greatest fencer in Hollywood. He is magnificent in his role as the evil Guy of Gisbourne. He is as dashing as Robin Hood, though less merry.

I'll stay my hand here and suggest a couple of good double features:
Captain Blood with almost the same cast filmed 3 years earlier; or,
The silent Robin Hood (1922) with Douglas Fairbanks Sr.

Fact: Alan Hale Sr play LIttle John in both the 1922 and 1938 versions! He's the father of Alan Hale Jr who was the Skipper on Gilligan's Island.

3) Rita's number 3 is Dawn Patrol (1938). Here's my 4-star review from Letterboxd - My user name is Rema if you want to read more.

There were two The Dawn Patrols made in the 1930’s: the original in 1930 and a remake in 1938. This is study in how different equally good talents synergize in different ways. The same script is used in both (judiciously tweaked for the remake),a very similar set and a lot of the same aerial and bombing footage. But a different director and cast. What a difference! The remake wins – hands down.

The 1930 Howard Hawks version stars Richard Barthelmess, Douglas Fairbanks Jr (both of whom had affairs with Marlene Dietrich) and Neil Hamilton (whose enduring fame will be as Commissioner Gordon in the original Batman TV show). Despite their similar romantic background, Barthelmess and Fairbanks don't exhibit the easy, uninhibited camaraderie of the later cast.

They can't stand up in comparison to the 1938 mega-watt stars Errol Flynn, David Niven and Basil Rathbone. Flynn, Niven and Rathbone fairly pop their buttons with energy and charisma. Flynn and Niven were also good friends, which cemented their chemistry on film.

In addition, Flynn, et. al. are aided by better lighting, better sound and a more fluid directorial style. Talkies had only been around for about a year when the first version was filmed, so the eight years of technical advancement between the 2 versions accounts for some the 1938’s enhanced vivacity and glamour.

Rathbone, who was a decorated WWI veteran, is a more commanding actor that Neil Hamilton. Rathbone dominates the screen as the twitchy, cold-eyed officer who is forced to send untested pilots to their certain deaths. His style is more theatrically grand in comparison to Flynn and Niven’s naturalistic, casual acting but it works to convey the intensity of his pain at being stuck in the rotten job he was given.

Both films have an exciting battle sequence at the end, using much of the same footage shot by Hawkes. I think the 1938 version squeaks ahead on this final battle just a little because Flynn is so doggone handsome.
Double feature with Porco Rosso (1992).

Foibles Episode 12 Errol Flynn Part 1 - He was a nasty little boy

Foibles Episode 12 Errol Flynn Part 1 - He was a nasty little boy

March 16, 2019

Errol Flynn Podcast Notes

Bibliography:

My Days with Errol Flynn by Buster Wiles, 1988. (Mostly about Wiles and a few anecdotes about Flynn. Not very well written.)
Errol Flynn: A Memoir by Earl Conrad, 1978. (Written by the ghost writer of Flynn's autobiography, My Wicked Wicked Ways. Mostly covers the sad, decadent last year of Flynn's life.)
The Two Lives of Errol Flynn by Michael Freedland, 1978. (Contains a few unique anedotes from co-stars such as Ida Lupino.)
The Life and Work of Errol Flynn: A Psycholanalytical Biography by B. Dramov, 2005. (Very sympathetic to Flynn and finger-pointing at his mother and other women - it's true they were pretty rough. But let's him off the hook for his behavior.)
My Wicked, Wicked Ways by Errol Flynn, 1959. (This came out just after Flynn's death. It's sad that he had to rely on a ghost writer because Flynn had been a writer in his younger, healthier days.)
The Films of Errol Flynn by Tony Thomas, et. al., 1969.

Documentaries:

Errol Flynn: Portait of a Swashbuckler, Kultur, 1993.
The Adventures of Errol Flynn, Turner Entertainment Co, 2005.

Best Errol Flynn Movies:

Flynn had a lot of box office success in dozens of mediocre or worst quality films. But, particularly, early in his career he starred in a come gems. Xoe and I agree that the two best by far are
1) Captain Blood (1935) Here's my 5-star review from Letterboxd - My user name is Rema if you want to read more.
Blood! Blood!! Blood!!!
When I first saw this in my 20's, I could not believe that such a wonderful thing existed. Absolutely witty, action -packed and joyous.
I immediately fell in love with Basil Rathbone, the greatest fencer in Hollywood. My friend was the Errol Flynn fan. Though he was one of the prettiest humans to ever live, he was too good-looking for me. Luckily, his success in this role emanates from an earnest insouciance and obvious intelligence, as well as, a bouncy charm - not just good looks.
As I watch this again for the 20th time, it is easy to see that Flynn is, by far, a better actor than Rathbone. And Flynn's immediate star status is understandable. Honestly, I don't think anyone else in the history of cinema could actually carry off the line, "Bedad, that's queer!"
But the script and direction would made this film a hit anyway. Based on Rafael Sabatini's novel Captain Blood, there is ready-made witty dialogue that the screenwriters had the good sense to retain. Director Michael Curtiz is a powerful action stylist, who proves verisimilitude tempered with human pathos or humor, as needed.
This is the first pairing of Flynn with 17-year-old Olivia de Haviland. Her character Arabella Bishop is a good match for Peter Blood because she has agency, which she exercises to the frustration and ultimate delight of Captain Blood.
There are so many wonderful studio character actors here that I can't start or I would never stop. Peruse the IMDB page to see all great actors in this (Guy Kibbee, Henry Stephenson...)
One tidbit I read in Basil Rathbone's biography: He thought it would a cool idea if he kept his eyes open after he died during a duel, like a real corpse. Unfortunately for him, the duel took place on a beach and he fell into the ocean. The saltwater stung his eyes like the bejesus. Watch the scene as see how hard it is for him to keep his eyes open.
The best double feature for this is The Adventures of Robin Hood, with essentially the same cast.

2) The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) Here's my 5-star review from Letterboxd - My user name is Rema if you want to read more.
In 80 years, no one has done the story of Robin Hood better or even as well. And in 80 years, there has been no one who is a better Robin Hood than Errol Flynn.
Flynn and the rest of the cast attack the centuries old myth of Robin Hood with a joie de vivre that is impossible to resist. Critical judgment is put on hold until the last hearty laugh echoes away. And there are as many laughs, chortles, chuckles and guffaws as there are stars in the sky.
Yes, everything is Hollywood -ized and glamorized but what a tale, what fun!
This is a film that is so chock-full of studio contract players that if I started I would go on and on. So I will pick a very few, warning you that I am leaving large painful holes in this review:
Olivia de Havilland (Maid Marian) (FYI- She still alive and 101 in 2018!!) - I must speak about her performance because I have overlooked her intelligent approach to a fairly thin role. You can see behind her eyes that Marian is no dope, though she has been duped by her class and privilege about the plight of the English. It is easy to believe that once she sees the truth that her intelligence and compassion will force her to act against her class (sort of).
Basil Rathbone - who I love so much I once names my cat Rasil Bathbone. One of the greatest fencer in Hollywood. He is magnificent in his role as the evil Guy of Gisbourne. He is as dashing as Robin Hood, though less merry.
I'll stay my hand here and suggest a couple of good double features:
Captain Blood with almost the same cast filmed 3 years earlier; or,
The silent Robin Hood (1922) with Douglas Fairbanks Sr.
Fact: Alan Hale Sr play LIttle John in both the 1922 and 1938 versions! He's the father of Alan Hale Jr who was the Skipper on Gilligan's Island.

3) Rita's number 3 is Dawn Patrol (1938). Here's my 4-star review from Letterboxd - My user name is Rema if you want to read more.
There were two The Dawn Patrols made in the 1930’s: the original in 1930 and a remake in 1938. This is study in how different equally good talents synergize in different ways. The same script is used in both (judiciously tweaked for the remake),a very similar set and a lot of the same aerial and bombing footage. But a different director and cast. What a difference! The remake wins – hands down.
The 1930 Howard Hawks version stars Richard Barthelmess, Douglas Fairbanks Jr (both of whom had affairs with Marlene Dietrich) and Neil Hamilton (whose enduring fame will be as Commissioner Gordon in the original Batman TV show). Despite their similar romantic background, Barthelmess and Fairbanks don't exhibit the easy, uninhibited camaraderie of the later cast.
They can't stand up in comparison to the 1938 mega-watt stars Errol Flynn, David Niven and Basil Rathbone. Flynn, Niven and Rathbone fairly pop their buttons with energy and charisma. Flynn and Niven were also good friends, which cemented their chemistry on film.
In addition, Flynn, et. al. are aided by better lighting, better sound and a more fluid directorial style. Talkies had only been around for about a year when the first version was filmed, so the eight years of technical advancement between the 2 versions accounts for some the 1938’s enhanced vivacity and glamour.
Rathbone, who was a decorated WWI veteran, is a more commanding actor that Neil Hamilton. Rathbone dominates the screen as the twitchy, cold-eyed officer who is forced to send untested pilots to their certain deaths. His style is more theatrically grand in comparison to Flynn and Niven’s naturalistic, casual acting but it works to convey the intensity of his pain at being stuck in the rotten job he was given.
Both films have an exciting battle sequence at the end, using much of the same footage shot by Hawkes. I think the 1938 version squeaks ahead on this final battle just a little because Flynn is so doggone handsome.
Double feature with Porco Rosso (1992).

Episode 11: The Maltese Falcon (1941)

Episode 11: The Maltese Falcon (1941)

February 1, 2019

We discuss the classic noir The Maltese Falcon with Humphrey Bogart and Mary Astor, the performances, the book, and some blatant queer-coding in the film. It's a masterpiece.

Foibles Episode 10 Our Best, Worst Films

Foibles Episode 10 Our Best, Worst Films

December 22, 2018

A full version of the shownotes coming soon

Best Worst Movies:
1. Laser Mission (1989)
2. Road House (1989)
3. Ninja III: The Domination (1984)- with Sho Kusugi and Linda Dickey. A sexy aeorobic instrocutor/linewoman is possesed by the spirit of a vengeful ninja.
4. Blind (2017)
5. Doppelganger (1993)
6. The Instructor (1981)- Bob Cheney, martial arts instructor and second-rate Burt Reynolds mixes a hallmark card with exploitation elements and chain saw battles in Akron, Ohio.
7. Hard Target (1993)
8. The Visitor (1979)- John Huston, Glenn Ford, Lance Henriksen among others in this odd mashup of The Exorcist, The Birds, and Starwars set in the Guggenheim
9. Step Up 2: The Streets (2008)
10. Flashdance (1983)
11. The Naked Jungle (1954)
12. Signs (2002)
13. Pompeii (2014)

Music- Future Mind by Powerbleeder

A Quick Update on our new Email

A Quick Update on our new Email

December 15, 2018

Our next full episode "Top Ten Worst Movies" will be out soon. In the meantime, send us any questions or requests via email. We're accepting suggestions for future topics!

foiblespodcast@gmail.com 

Episode 9 Part 2: The Scandal- Dorothy L Sayer’s Lord Peter Wimsey Novels

Episode 9 Part 2: The Scandal- Dorothy L Sayer’s Lord Peter Wimsey Novels

November 3, 2018

Episode 9 "Lord Peter Wimsey Novels" Shownotes

Links to Pictures of Dorothy's Crushes and Flames:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Cournos
http://www.writeopinions.com/eric-whelpton
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_Allen_(conductor)

Music:

Mendelssohn's String Quartet in E minor Op. 44/2- 3. Andante

Wimsey novels in chronological order:

Whose Body? (1923)
Clouds of Witness (1926)
Unnatural Death (1927)
The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club (1928)
Strong Poison (1931)- Xoe's Fav
The Five Red Herrings (1931)
Have His Carcase (1932) - Rita's favorite
Murder Must Advertise (1933) - Rita and Xoe's favorite
The Nine Tailors (1934)- Xoe's favorite
Gaudy Night (1935)
Busman's Honeymoon (1937)

Bibliography:

Brabazon, James. Dorothy L. Sayers: A Biography, 1981.
Coomes, David. Dorothy L. Sayers: A Careless Rage for Life, 1992.
Dale, Alzina Stone. The Story of Dorothy L. Sayers, 1978.
Hitchman, Janet. Such a Strange Lady, 1975.
Kenney, Catherine McGehee. The Remarkable Case of Dorothy L. Sayers, 1990. (A scholarly look at the themes of social criticism in Sayers' work.)
Reynolds, Barbara. Dorothy L. Sayers: Her Life and Soul, 1993. (The best one in my opinion. It is writen in an open, modern style and contain many more pictures than than the others.)

Video:

The best series - A Dorothy L Sayers Mystery. BBC, 1987. This cover 3 out 4 of the Wimsey/Vane books -
Strong Poison (in which they meet and Peter saves Harriet from the gallows),
Have His Carcase (in which Harriet finds a body, which subsequently disappears, and partners with Peter in investigating and solving the murder),
Gaudy Night (in which Harriet goes back Oxford for a reunion and runs into a mystery about a vicious vandal; while the plots thickens, so does their romance).
Best Wimsey is Edward Petherbridge and best Vane is Harriet Walter, both of whom are in this series.

The other series was made by the BBC in 1970. It starred Ian Carmichel as Wimsey. Carmichel looks nothing like Wimsey and, to my mind, does not act like Wimsey either. This series includes:
The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club
The Nine Tailors
Murder Must Advertise
Five Red Herrings
Clouds of Witness

There were also a couple films made, both of which Sayers absolutely hated. They are:
The Silent Passenger, 1935, British, starring John Loden and Peter Haddon.
Busman's Honeymoon (US: The Haunted Honeymoon), starring Robert Montgomery and Constance Cummings, 1940.

A short Interview with Edward Petherbridge on playing Lord Peter Wimsey:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WsMOMbCpBFU

Link to an article illustration about Sayer's advertisment for Guiness:

https://vinepair.com/articles/history-guinness-toucan-ads/

Episode 9 Part 1: “As My Wimsey Takes Me”- The Mystery Novels of Dorothy L. Sayers

Episode 9 Part 1: “As My Wimsey Takes Me”- The Mystery Novels of Dorothy L. Sayers

September 8, 2018

Music:
Mendelssohn's String Quartet in E minor Op. 44/2- 3. Andante

Wimsey novels in chronological order:
Whose Body? (1923)
Clouds of Witness (1926)
Unnatural Death (1927)
The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club (1928)
Strong Poison (1931)- Xoe's Fav
The Five Red Herrings (1931)
Have His Carcase (1932) - Rita's favorite
Murder Must Advertise (1933) - Rita and Xoe's favorite
The Nine Tailors (1934)- Xoe's favorite
Gaudy Night (1935)
Busman's Honeymoon (1937)

Bibliography:
Brabazon, James. Dorothy L. Sayers: A Biography, 1981.
Coomes, David. Dorothy L. Sayers: A Careless Rage for Life, 1992.
Dale, Alzina Stone. The Story of Dorothy L. Sayers, 1978.
Hitchman, Janet. Such a Strange Lady, 1975.
Kenney, Catherine McGehee. The Remarkable Case of Dorothy L. Sayers, 1990. (A scholarly look at the themes of social criticism in Sayers' work.)
Reynolds, Barbara. Dorothy L. Sayers: Her Life and Soul, 1993. (The best one in my opinion. It is writen in an open, modern style and contain many more pictures than than the others.)

Video:
The best series - A Dorothy L Sayers Mystery. BBC, 1987. This cover 3 out 4 of the Wimsey/Vane books -
Strong Poison (in which they meet and Peter saves Harriet from the gallows),
Have His Carcase (in which Harriet finds a body, which subsequently disappears, and partners with Peter in investigating and solving the murder),
Gaudy Night (in which Harriet goes back Oxford for a reunion and runs into a mystery about a vicious vandal; while the plots thickens, so does their romance).
Best Wimsey is Edward Petherbridge and best Vane is Harriet Walter, both of whom are in this series.
The other series was made by the BBC in 1970. It starred Ian Carmichel as Wimsey. Carmichel looks nothing like Wimsey and, to my mind, does not act like Wimsey either.

This series includes:
The Unpleasantness at the Bellona Club
The Nine Tailors
Murder Must Advertise
Five Red Herrings
Clouds of Witness

There were also a couple films made, both of which Sayers absolutely hated. They are:
The Silent Passenger, 1935, British, starring John Loden and Peter Haddon.
Busman's Honeymoon (US: The Haunted Honeymoon), starring Robert Montgomery and Constance Cummings, 1940.

A short Interview with Edward Patherbridge on playing Lord Peter Wimsey:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WsMOMbCpBFU

Link to an article illustration about Sayer's advertisment for Guiness:

https://vinepair.com/articles/history-guinness-toucan-ads/

Rita’s Mini Reviews: Pheonix (2014) (film)

Rita’s Mini Reviews: Pheonix (2014) (film)

April 7, 2018

Pheonix, a 2014 German film.

Episode 8: Perry Mason Reprise (the drinking game)

Episode 8: Perry Mason Reprise (the drinking game)

March 24, 2018

The Perry Mason Drinking Game

Drink when:

-Someone says the title of the episode
-There’s a very famous actor e.g. Robert Redford
-when someone pours an alcoholic drink
-There’s a Dabbs Greer sighting
-Della demonstrates sisterhood solidarity
-Anytime Paul Drake says “Hi, beautiful.”
-A secretary has an affair with her boss
-Anyone sniffs a piece of evidence (drink twice if Perry sniffs a gun)
-Perry holds a woman’s elbow
-Someone flings themselves onto Perry’s chest- drink twice
-Paul loses someone he’s tailing
-Someone checks a car’s registration
-You first see a shot of Peaches “Boom-Boom” Burger (Hamilton Burger’s mother, usually an extra in courtroom scenes)

-A lawyer claims a question is “Immaterial, incompetent, and irrelevant.” (All or any)
- Burger whines something like “Your honor, Mason is up to his old tricks!”
-A motion is ruled against Perry
-when there’s a woman judge
-Someone breaks down dramatically on the stand/in court
-If Perry loses a case, finish the bottle
-Finish your drink for any change in Perry’s office decor
-Finish your drink if any dates that are mentioned fall on your birthday
-Everyone takes bets on the murderer by the 35 minute mark, if you’re right, finish your drink

Other Prompts:

-Call out when you see a familiar secondary actor or prop
-William Hopper first appears, yell his name in falsetto
-When Della wears a nice outfit tell her how cute she looks
-When a judge calls a recess for lunch, or because it is “getting late,” ring a bell